Why Students Forget—and What You Can Do About It | Edutopia

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Our brains are wired to forget, but there are research-backed strategies you can use to make your teaching stick.

Source: Why Students Forget—and What You Can Do About It | Edutopia

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Put Working Memory to Work in Learning | Edutopia

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By Donna Wilson, Ph.D.

Editor’s Note: This post is co-authored by Marcus Conyers who, with Donna Wilson, is co-developer of the M.S. and Ed.S. Brain-Based Teaching degree programs at Nova Southeastern University.

 

Strengthen your students’ conscious processing of information with techniques like repetition, gamification, visualization, emphasizing relevance, and peer teaching.

Source: Put Working Memory to Work in Learning | Edutopia

Cooking and Problem-Solving with Kids | Psychology Today

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By Jamie Krenn Ph.D.

   

Why it’s important for problem-solving to take place in your kitchen.

“While problem-solving skills are not taught directly in the classroom, they are part of everyday life building skills. It is important to provide children real world examples and some rationale behind their thinking from cognitive, developmental and culinary arts perspectives (1). Food preparation is an opportunity to apply problem-solving concepts to real-life situations. This skill in the kitchen is a necessity when it comes to working with fewer ingredients, having limited availability of food sources or even restricted time due to everyday life challenges. ”

Source: Cooking and Problem-Solving with Kids | Psychology Today

Can Stress Help Students? | Edutopia

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by Renee Jain,  Founder of GoZen.com – Anxiety Relief Programs for Children

“Stress might not always be the enemy. Research shows that positive stress can strengthen the immune system, enhance memory and learning, and improve decision-making skills.”

Seven ideas to helping  student stress better.

1. Stop Highlighting Negative Consequences
2. Introduce the Evolutionary Purpose of Stress
3. Explore Distress and Eustress
4. Study the Researched Benefits
5. Cultivate a Positive Stress Mindset
6. Encourage Contingency Planning
7. Exemplify Distress Leading to Growth

Read the full articles: Can Stress Help Students? | Edutopia